Art

November 27 2013

Do you really think there is an interior environment that wouldn’t be made more beautiful, more tranquil, more cool with the addition of a peaceful image of ocean scenery?

We don’t think so. Without a doubt, the cure for the visual noise and image overload in our lives comes in the form of a stunning photograph by Luke Shadbolt of the central coast of NSW.

The picture seem like an oil painting, but it is in reality an expertly composed photograph.

Imagine a quiet beach, a soft morning breeze on your skin, the scent of the ocean, the sound of the soft waves. This image will transport you to your favourite seaside places as they expand and calm down any interior with its serene atmosphere and gorgeous colours. Now, just take a deep breath and relax.

 



Buy it here - Exclusive to TCH store.

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Offices

November 20 2013

Walls don’t often strike us as exciting, but in this office project for ON Headquarters, located west of Mexico City, we really do like the large surfaces. We also like the subtle, elegant lighting, and the subdued colour scheme.

ON provides services to the oil and gas industry, so the designers at LSA Arquitectos and BLANCASMORAN (Imanol Legorreta Molina, Pablo Sepúlveda de Yturbe and Abel Blancas Morán) selected surface materials and textures that reflect the passing of time.

The boardroom exterior walls and the directors offices are covered in walnut veneer, the lobby walls and the customized assistants’ blocks in the concourse are of Iranian Travertine marble, and the interior walls of the boardroom are of wool fabric.

The floors in the lobby and concourse are covered with metal sheeting, and in the directors’ offices with oak

Much of the furniture is custom-made, including the welcome desk that is made of metal sheeting and black Emperador marble. The chairs are desks are by VITRA and the lighting by Construlita, Delta Light and Tom Dixon.


 
The overall effect the designers have accomlished in this 780 square-meter (8,395 sq.ft) space is calm, opulent and restrained. - Tuija Seipell. (Images by Rafael Gamo)

See the world's best in office design here
 

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Stores

November 18 2013

Rotate: Curated by The Cool Hunter – A completely new surprising shopping experience every 8 weeks. Always new, always different, always changing.

At  TCH, we are always into something new. Just cannot help ourselves. A year ago, we launched the temporary two-week The Cool House in Melbourne & Sydney. More than 10,000 people attended and it was a huge success.


 
But rather than repeat ourselves this year, we wanted to evolve this cool concept. The result: Rotate by The Cool Hunter – a store that will stay in place for a year but the theme will change every eight weeks. New theme, new store, new everything every two months. Blink, and the shop has changed completely! Blink, and you’ve missed it! If you want it, you need to buy it now. It won’t be there next time.
 
Good bye to the same old boring sets of stores. Every mall, every airport, ever shopping street – the same stores, the same brands, same standard look-alike themes. Welcome Rotate by The Cool Hunter – the shop full of surprises, the concept that does not stand still.

The Rotate Concept:

These themed temporary pop-up stores will constantly evolve - and not just a changing window display or a few new products. The entire setup and product mix will change every 8 weeks.
 
There will be a new theme for each period e.g. Summer Lovers, The Art Hunter, Colour Your World, Winter Wonderland. But this won't be your regular, boring store either – Rotate will be fun, innovative, interactive and visually spectacular.
 
Products and brands will be carefully curated by The Cool Hunter Team and feature amazing local brands and unique international offerings.

Our first theme "Summer Lovers" launches in Sydney in 2 weeks - stay tuned for more info later this month.

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Stores

November 14 2013

We like this Run Colors sneaker store in Poznań (Poland), because it breaks some very tired and boring patterns that have become the norm in sneaker retail.
 
We’ve seen more than enough of massive images of sports heroes among cavernous, multi-storey stores that feel more like warehouses than shops created for humans to enjoy.


 
The stuffy “gentlemen’s club” milieu has also been done to death, and no matter how hip or edgy the art on the walls or the celebrity behind the clichéd ideas, stuffy is still only stuffy.

In addition, sports stores and sports brands have become so incredibly logo-happy that it seems impossible to find great, functional sporty footwear, clothing or accessories without appearing like an ad for a brand. Tone it down already, we say.


 
But this minimalist shop – the second one of the Warsaw-based Run Colors - looks refreshingly different in its bare-bones simplicity.
 
The slate-grey surfaces work beautifully as a background for the colourful footwear selection that in this store consists mainly of limited series of Nike, Adidas and New Balance sneakers.


 
Poznań-based mode:lina architekci team of founders, Paweł Garus and Jerzy Woźniak, and designers, Kinga Kin and Agnieszka Owsiany, took the Run Colors name literally and had some understated fun with it.
 
They imagined colors running and thought of shoelaces, and from there they devised the simple colorful ropes theme that runs throughout the 110 square meter (1184 square foot) store.


 
We love the antique furnishings, and the complete lack of signs, logos, tags or images. It also does not hurt that this store is in Poznań’s famed Stary Browar complex that is a former Hugger Brewery and dates back to 1844. - Tuija Seipell

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Art

November 13 2013

Once again, we find ourselves mesmerized by abstract visual art that leaves an opening for our own interpretations. With the work of Houston, Texas-based Heath West, we are given the freedom to experience pixelated pattern in whatever way we wish to.

We see these mystery images, seemingly lit from the inside, as calming and meditative visual “white noise” that either energize or clam down a room, depending on how the images are placed and lit.

West is a practicing architect, who also studied art and art history. He uses several tools within Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop and describes his method as ”developing and working through an algorithm of vector and pixel color manipulation, a recursive loop, where the stopping point is when the image achieves the quality I am happy with.” 

These limited edition metallic prints, exclusive to the TCH store, are printed on metallic paper then mounted underneath perspex for a dazzling and striking look. 

A specialised process called 'face-mounting' is used to create a durable bond between the print and acrylic (perspex). A high quality acrylic is used to provide superior UV protection.

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Lifestyle

November 12 2013

Even the most minimalist and monochromatic of environments needs a drop of colour to anchor the restrained surroundings. This is especially true in the kitchen, the place where we often spend more time than in the living or dining room that seem to get all the attention.

So we call in Tom Dixon and his Fluoro Orange – the deliciously sleek fluorescent shade of carrot. Dixon uses this shade in many accessories but we have our eyes set on the wooden Tower Pepper and Salt Grinders.

These punctuation marks for the kitchen – and for the dining room table - are substantial yet functional. The taller one, the pepper grinder, is 36 centimeters (14.2. inches) tall and happily takes the role of a center piece in any setting. Buy here.

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Food

November 11 2013

This stylish restoration of a nearly 200 year-old wine cellar combines many of our favourite attributes in a renovation: generous use of aged and new wood, lavish open spaces and a minimalist colour palette.


 
This stylish restoration of a nearly 200 year-old wine cellar captivates us with its overall minimalist approach. It transforms the historic space to meet modern needs yet does so without losing the elegant patina and without destroying the authenticity and uniqueness of this particular location. It is not easy know where to stop, which is why so many renovations damage what was already good. Not this time.


 
The renovation was completed earlier this year by Lisbon, Portugal-based P06-Nuno Gusmão. The creative director of the project was Nuno Gusmão and the design leads Giuseppe Greco and Joana Proserpio.


 
The building, Graham’s Lodge, is located in Portugal in Vila Nova de Gaia on the Douro river estuary near the Atlantic Ocean.


 
The granite-walled Lodge is now not just a real, functional working building where thousands of casks of Port are aged, but also an immersive visitor centre where Graham’s Vintage Ports can be tasted and experienced as part of guided tours.
 
W & J Graham’s was founded in Oporto, Portugal, in 1820 by two Scottish brothers, William and John Graham.


 
The Lodge opened to the public for the first time in 1993, but the current renovation, commissioned by the Symington family that owns the company today, takes the visit of the constantly increasing numbers of visitors from a typical “winery tour” to an exciting, authentic experience.



The guided visits now include a visitor reception hall leading to an auditorium, the two-level Graham’s Museum, the Lodge itself, a tasting room, the Vintage Room, a shop and a wine bar and restaurant. Among the fake historic environments so prevalent in wineries, it is refreshing to see the real thing once in a while. - Tuija Seipell.

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Design

November 7 2013



Wood is both universal and unique. No other material is as deeply embedded in the history, culture and life of humans worldwide as wood, yet every single piece of wood is unique.



The color tone, texture, durability, flexibility and even sound qualities of different tree species have puzzled and challenged artists, architects, designers, builders and artisans for thousands of years.

Still today, nothing matches wood in versatility or beauty, so it is great to see how today’s designers and architects continue to face the challenge of wood, and use it creatively to interpret sleek, modern designs.



They use wood to meet their current needs and desires for which wood is ideally suited. People seek calm surroundings, simplicity and minimalism to soothe their frayed nerves and to counter the constant visual overload they face. Wood’s warmth and natural beauty works wonders for creating a sense of balance and calm.



People also look for sustainable alternatives, eco-friendly options, greener solutions. When harvested, managed and used sustainably, forests are still the source of the greatest material on earth.



We especially love the influence of Scandinavian and Japanese traditions that we can detect in today’s wood architecture and design. Minimalist, functional, beautiful, and light in both color and weight.



Scandinavian building and design traditions are based solidly on the use of wood. Finnish modernist master, architect Alvar Aalto, stunned the world with Living Wood, his design for the Finnish Pavilion for the Paris World Exposition in 1937. In the pavilion, he combined both traditional and modern architecture and showcased his functionalist design sensibilities. It was considered one of the boldest and most innovative pavilions of the Expo.



Earlier, Aalto’s exploration of the limits of bent wood and mass production had resulted in the  Paimio chair (1931) and other furniture classics, and had a permanent impact on how furniture looks even today. Aalto’s work influenced many other modernist masters including Charles and Ray Eames and Eero Saarinen.



The use of wood in Japanese architecture and design is characterized by austere construction methods, the lightness of materials, the connectedness between indoors and outdoors, and the way in which buildings merge with their surroundings.



With hardly any furniture used inside, Japanese master craftsmen were able to focus their skills on the buildings themselves, on skilful joining of sections without nails, and on revealing, rather than covering or adorning, the original texture and tone of the wood.







Wood as a material has held a charmed place in architecture and design for both its simplicity and complexity. It lends itself to imposing, bulky structures, yet also yields to delicate, undulating forms that seem lacy and transparent.

We love this lightness and elegance, the play of light and shadow, the countless tones of color that can be achieved with skilful use of wood both structurally and decoratively.



In more and more residential projects, both big and small, architects and designers are finding new, creative ways to reveal and highlight the beauty and versatility of wood. They manage to create structures that appear current and cool, yet also exude a classic, timeless elegance.





Every day, we come across images of fantastic single-use residences, recreational cottages, furniture, decks and patios, where the qualities of wood are perfectly matched with the users’ needs and the requirements of the surroundings as well.



In retail and hospitality, wood is also making an impact. We love the blocky, clean look of the Aesop stores. At the other end of the spectrum a good example is the lightness and playfulness achieved in RDAI Architects’ use of wood-slat “huts” as departments in the Paris Hermès store built inside an old hotel swimming pool.



In not just eco-lodges, but also in luxury resorts, spas and hotels, wood is becoming the material of choice. As guests are looking for a retreat, a sense of being back in nature, a quilt-free, tranquil vacation, resorts are responding with wood-frame structures, wood interiors and sustainable solutions that also look fabulous.



Wood is not trendy yet it is incredibly cool. It is a demanding, noble, ancient, living material that we have the privilege to use and enjoy. In wood, the architect, designer and builder face the exhilarating challenge of the sculptor — to reveal the character of the specific species, the individual tree. And we, the viewers and users of their work, have the opportunity to discover it for ourselves. We are looking forward to more. - Tuija Seipell.

At TCH, we are so obsessed with wood that we even created Treelife, an event to showcase the most innovate work using wood in the design of Treehouses.

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Music

October 17 2013
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Offices

October 3 2013

Our fascination with cool offices continues. This time, we are attracted to a Victorian building in Dublin.



This past June, after only six months of elaborate reconstruction and renovation, global insurance firm XL Group plc moved into one of the most prestigious addresses in Dublin, Ireland.



The former private club building at Number 8 St. Stephen’s Green is a protected structure, which made the job of RKD Architects that much more challenging.



RKD’s not-so-easy task was to respect the original building and its later reiterations, while making sure XL Group’s staff and management had all the tools and comforts of a modern office.



The building dates back to 1792 when it was constructed as an imposing, five-bay, four-storeys- over-basement residence for Lord Mountgarrat. From 1847 to 2003, it was owned by the Hibernian United Services Club and operated as a private club.


 
After the 6.5 million Euro (about $8.2 mil. US) renovation, the grand scale, elegance and drama of a private gentlemen’s club are still intact, and the unseemly practicalities of air conditioning, IT and plumbing are discreetly and stylishly hidden behind cabinetry and other structures.


 
Reinforcing and restoring the best parts of the building has left, for example, the grand Portland-stone staircase as the central eye-catcher at the entrance, and given the staff and clients an impressive environment that demands attention.


 
We love the ceilings, the exposed brick, and the mirrors and subtle insertions of colour in the modern offices.


 
In even the most updated of the spaces, there is some aspect that reminds of the past and shows off the peculiarities of the grand, old building. - Tuija Seipell.


 

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